DXMachina (dxmachina) wrote,
DXMachina
dxmachina

Happy Father's Day

Pretty much all you need to know about my dad can be summed up in the following two items. The first is from an e-mail my mom sent me last January:

"Cassie has always LOVED the snow. Her thick fur and all, she would have been a great sled dog up north. Over the years, when Dad took her out, he would throw little snow balls for her to catch and eat. She came to expect them and wait for him to get the snow (from clean places) for her. These days, the old lady is barely able to get out and do what she has to and back in the house.

"After the last snow storm, I found Dad in the kitchen, feeding Cassie
snow balls he brought inside for her..."




The second is from a Calvin and Hobbes strip that captures the essence of a lot of the conversations I had with my dad when I was young:

Calvin: Dad, how come old photographs are always black and white? Didn't
they have color film back then?

Dad: Sure they did. In fact, those old photographs ARE in color. It's
just the WORLD was black and white then.

Calvin: Really?

Dad: Yep. The world didn't turn color until sometime in the 1930's, and
it was pretty grainy color for a while, too.

Calvin: That's really weird.

Dad: Well, truth is stranger than fiction.

Calvin: But then why are old PAINTINGS in color?! If the world was black
and white, wouldn't artists have painted it that way?

Dad: Not necessarily. A lot of great artists were insane.

Calvin: But... but how could they have painted in color anyway? Wouldn't
their paints have been shades of gray back then?

Dad: Or course, but they turned colors like everything else did in the
'30s.

Calvin: So why didn't old black and white photos turn color too?

Dad: Because they were color pictures of black and white, remember?
Tags: family
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